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I went on a movie marathon the other day and watched both movies pretty much back to back. Here are my reviews…

THIS IS IT-
This movie basically showed us Michael Jackson’s swan song- the epic tour he was working on full throttle (tickets already sold out in most cities it would be visiting). I thought incorrectly that rehearsal footage would not be compelling enough to keep me engaged for a 2 hour film. It was fascinating to see the process, the incredible production value, and to get such a close up on the man- who’s voice and moves were as impressive as ever!

On on one hand it could appear like a tragedy that this tour never got to be realized. On the other hand, it is realized and brought to the world through this movie, and may likely more people in that medium than it would as a music tour.

I was very touched by the new rendition of Earth Song and his clear caring message about the Earth.
In his words “That’s why I write these kind of songs, you know, to give some sense of awareness and awakening and hope to people. I LOVE the planet.”

Here is a video of his ‘final rehearsal’ of They don’t really care about us.

It was truly inspiring to see the passion, emotion and message behind it all and how epic of a production he was making.
Go see the movie!

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2012

Going to see a film with the title 2012, I was hoping for some deep messages, considering that there are a lot of complex and profound prophecies and theories about what kind of transformation might happen at that time. That is asking too much of Hollywood. Instead it co-opted and oversimplified the Mayan prophecy and turned it into an unrealistic, way oversensationalized action film about the end of the world.

WHAT I DIDN’T LIKE ABOUT IT

* It put 2012 on the radar screen of the mass public from a doom gloom fear perspective only
* It underplayed the deaths of millions and overplayed the plight of one family clinging to their lives
* It got cheesy a few times and the unrealistic factor took me out of it when I should be most compelled
* It put all responsibility for our demise on the earth/sun instead of our own actions
* It could of and didn’t really interject any truly redemptive or spiritual messages

WHAT I LIKED ABOUT IT

* There is something very cathartic and profound about seeing such extreme destruction and sort of having the worst case     scenario played out on the screen to experience without experiencing.
* The effects were impressive and well done, and the action was quite exciting.
* There was also some commentary about social values, power politics and compassion.
* It did highlight for me how fragile and precious is the life we have right now and how much we should appreciate it.

What both movies had in common is that I walked out of the theater feeling so GLAD TO BE ALIVE!!!

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Mtv stands for Music Television. But don’t go looking for music videos anymore, unfortunately they have been replaced by a whole slew of bad “reality” tv shows.  VH1 is almost as bad. I don’t watch a lot of tv, but when I do, I want to check out some new music videos, so I go to these two channels and instead get subjected to superficial immature (but eye candy) people and their weird competitive interactions, and shows designed to get people to cut each other down so that they can be the “love” or “best friend” of some slightly famous person. 2 questions– What kind of values are these shows promoting? And What does any of this have to do with music??

A recent article in the New York Times entitled ‘Make Room, Cynics; MTV Wants to Do Some Good’ seems to claim that I am not the only one complaining about recent programming and that the executives have taken note and had a meeting to discuss a transformative direction in their programming.

“Meet MTV for the era of Obama. After years of celebrating wealth, celebrity and the vapid excesses of youth, MTV is trying to gloss its escapist entertainment with a veneer of positive social messages.

Last fall, after the financial crisis erupted but before the presidential election, MTV executives gathered in New York for meetings to discuss the direction of the network and whether programs like “The Hills,” which chronicles the lives of the young and rich in Los Angeles, and “My Super Sweet 16,” a weekly visit to over-the-top coming-out parties, had trapped MTV in a decadent age that was passing.”

Let’s hope so.  Apparently, the ratings have going down, and so this discussion of values motivated by that, and also because Viacom, the network’s parent company has a new deal with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to make “shows more supportive of education.”

When can we expect to notice any positive educational changes in programming? Van Toffler, the president of MTV Networks says  “It’s not like you flip a light switch from one type of programming to another…” and that  “The notion of escapism will still live next to inspiration.”

Hm… What an interesting quote, huh? It is true, we do turn to the TV to provide us an escape, and that is fine. Personally, I am more interested in Music and Inspiration than junk food reality tv escape, so I will hope that MTV follows through with their intentions and in the meantime, I will just keep the TV off. ☺

By, Audette Sophia

You can read the whole article at : http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/19/business/media/19mtv.html?_r=1&scp=2&sq=mtv&st=cse